Category Archives: Photography Techniques

Using Teleconverters for BIF

This article discusses using teleconverters for BIF and some of the practical considerations that come into play with this type of photography. Many people love to photograph birds and really enjoy capturing images of birds-in-flight (BIF). Using long telephoto lenses can be a challenge. This is compounded when teleconverters are added to the mix.

All of the photographs featured in this article were captured handheld in about 2 hours and 15 minutes during a visit to the lift bridge in Burlington Ontario on Tuesday of this week.

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Measuring Background Blur

Measuring background blur can be an important tool when using M4/3 and other smaller sensor cameras, especially for photographers who previously used full frame gear. As humans we often fall into patterns of behaviour, some of which can be counterproductive if we have not adapted to a new situation.

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BIF Practice at 1600 mm

This article discusses an approach I use for BIF (birds-in-flight) practice at 1600 mm equivalent field-of-view. While I don’t usually¬† photograph birds-in-flight using this long focal length, I do find it beneficial to periodically practice my handheld technique and eye/hand coordination at this very long focal length.

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Photographing Approaching Birds

When photographing approaching birds a variety of methods can be used depending on the objectives of the photographer. Some species may be uncommon and sometimes getting any kind of image is a thrill. I always enjoy photographing approaching birds when they are coming in to land as these represent great opportunities to create bird photographs that feature interesting wing and body positions.

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Handheld HDR Test

This article features some handheld HDR (high dynamic range) test images that were captured at Westfield Heritage Village. My main objective doing these test photographs was to determine if a combination of 5 HDR exposures could be successfully taken without the use of a tripod, relying only on the IBIS performance of my Olympus camera gear. I apologize in advance for the quality of the HDR versions in this article.

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Stopping For Nature

This article discusses a ‘stopping for nature’ exercise and shares a selection of photographs captured during a recent walk at LaSalle Park in Burlington Ontario. All of the images in this article were created handheld using the E-M1X’s Bird Detection AI Subject Tracking technology.

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Old Habits Die Hard

There’s a well-used saying that “Old Habits Die Hard” which is applicable to various areas of our lives including photography. Humans tend to be creatures of habit. We can sometimes find ourselves falling into patterns of behaviour (including some that are counterproductive) without being aware of our habitual actions. The first step in changing old photographic habits is to become aware of them.

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Dragonflies at 1600 mm

This article discusses photographing dragonflies handheld at 1600 mm equivalent field-of-view, and shares a selection of new images. All photographs were captured using an E-M1X, M.Zuiko 100-400 mm f/5-6.3 IS and M.Zuiko MC-20 teleconverter. All images were created with my lens fully extended and fitted with the M.Zuiko MC-20 teleconverter. This produces a focal length of 800 mm (efov 1600 mm).

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100-400 Handheld Focus Stacking

This article features a selection of photographs that illustrate M.Zuiko 100-400 mm handheld focus stacking capability with the OM-D E-M1X and the M.Zuiko MC-14 teleconverter.

After viewing Peter Baumgartner’s presentation during World Photography Day I was inspired to try out my E-M1X’s focus stacking technology again. It has been well over a year since I last used this feature.

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