Laughing Kookaburra HHHR

During a recent visit to Bird Kingdom I had the opportunity to capture a small selection of Laughing Kookaburra HHHR images. Experimenting with Handheld Hi Res mode with my Olympus OM-D E-M1X is always an enjoyable pastime.

NOTE: Click on images to enlarge.

Our first Laughing Kookaburra HHHR image is a straight side profile.

Olympus OM-D E-M1X + M.Zuiko PRO 40-150 mm f/2.8 with M.Zuiko MC-20 teleconverter @ 220 mm, efov 440 mm, f/5.6, 1/320, ISO-1250

Here is a 100% crop from the above image.

Olympus OM-D E-M1X + M.Zuiko PRO 40-150 mm f/2.8 with M.Zuiko MC-20 teleconverter @ 220 mm, efov 440 mm, f/5.6, 1/320, ISO-1250, 100% crop

Our second sample Laughing Kookaburra HHHR image has a slightly different pose and more dramatic lighting.

Olympus OM-D E-M1X + M.Zuiko PRO 40-150 mm f/2.8 with M.Zuiko MC-20 teleconverter @ 230 mm, efov 460 mm, f/5.6, 1/320, ISO-800, subject distance 2.5 metres

100% crop from the above image…

Olympus OM-D E-M1X + M.Zuiko PRO 40-150 mm f/2.8 with M.Zuiko MC-20 teleconverter @ 230 mm, efov 460 mm, f/5.6, 1/320, ISO-800, subject distance 2.5 metres, 100% crop

Our final sample Laughing Kookaburra HHHR images is a portrait orientation.

Olympus OM-D E-M1X + M.Zuiko PRO 40-150 mm f/2.8 with M.Zuiko MC-20 teleconverter @ 212 mm, efov 424 mm, f/5.6, 1/320, ISO-800, subject distance 2.3 metres

The 100% crop is perhaps not quite as sharp as the first two. This may have been caused by a slight movement with the bird during image capture.

Olympus OM-D E-M1X + M.Zuiko PRO 40-150 mm f/2.8 with M.Zuiko MC-20 teleconverter @ 212 mm, efov 424 mm, f/5.6, 1/320, ISO-800, subject distance 2.3 metres, 100% crop

If you own an Olympus OM-D E-M1X or E-M1 Mark III and haven’t tried the Handheld Hi Res mode, you’re missing out on a very interesting and capable feature.

Technical Note:
Photographs were captured handheld using camera gear as noted in the EXIF data. All images were produced from RAW files using my standard process.

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4 thoughts on “Laughing Kookaburra HHHR”

  1. Great images as always. You will probably know, the Olympus EM1MkIII has just been released with hand-held HR mode. I would love to see some direct comparisons between HR and non HR mode (HR mode only works with a tripod in the MkII). It would help in deciding whether to upgrade from my MkII.

    1. Hi Colin,

      Yes, I was aware that the new OM-D E-M1 Mark III can now do HHHR images. Let me see what I can do in terms of putting together some kind of comparison between shooting with standard resolution and HHHR. I understand why that could be an important consideration for you.

      Tom

        1. Hi Colin,

          A couple of factors would come into play. If you were planning to do significant enlargements of your images… then pixel peep… I think cropping to the same field of view would make a lot of sense. That approach would give you a good idea of how standard resolution and HHHR would look when the files are enlarged to the same finished print size.

          Another approach would be to do the same % crop of each image. The field of view would be different but it would give you a sense of the quality you could expect if the same % enlargement of each base file was used. You’d end up with different print sizes of course.

          The other consideration is how well standard resolution vs HHHR would do in terms of dealing with noise at various ISO values.

          I will ponder this a bit…

          Tom

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