M.Zuiko 75-300 Heron Images

This article features a selection of M.Zuiko 75-300 heron images. All were recently captured handheld during a visit to Hendrie Valley. Many photographs are displayed as full frame captures, while others have been cropped. The degree of cropping done is detailed in the EXIF data where appropriate.

NOTE: Click on images to enlarge.

Olympus OM-D E-M1X + M.Zuiko 75-300 mm f/4.8-6.7 II @ 300 mm, efov 600 mm, f/6.7, 1/10, ISO-400

I started my visit early in the morning and decided to try some slow shutter speed test images with the M.Zuiko 75-300 mm f/4.8-6.7 II fully extended to 300 mm (efov 600 mm).

Often stoic in nature, Great Blue Herons make excellent subjects for this type of test. After capturing a number of consecutive images successfully at 1/20th of a second, I lowered my shutter speed to 1/10th of a second to take the photograph above. I’m not sure if this is the slowest that I can realistically do… more testing is required!

Olympus OM-D E-M1X + M.Zuiko 75-300 mm f/4.8-6.7 II @ 300 mm, efov 600 mm, f/6.7, 1/1600, ISO-2500, cropped to 4400 pixels on width

During my morning visit I had a few opportunities to capture Great Blue Herons in flight. I love the colouring of their wings and bodies.

Olympus OM-D E-M1X + M.Zuiko 75-300 mm f/4.8-6.7 II @ 300 mm, efov 600 mm, f/6.7, 1/1600, ISO-2500
Olympus OM-D E-M1X + M.Zuiko 75-300 mm f/4.8-6.7 II @ 300 mm, efov 600 mm, f/6.7, 1/1600, ISO-2500, cropped to 3994 pixels on width

My best opportunity for a close up run of images happened when a Great Blue Heron took flight, then circled around and came back in to land. The following seven images are from the same AF-C run (continuous auto-focus, high sequential silent shutter, 15 frames-per-second).

Olympus OM-D E-M1X + M.Zuiko 75-300 mm f/4.8-6.7 II @ 300 mm, efov 600 mm, f/6.7, 1/1600, ISO-2500, cropped to 4457 pixels on width
Olympus OM-D E-M1X + M.Zuiko 75-300 mm f/4.8-6.7 II @ 300 mm, efov 600 mm, f/6.7, 1/1600, ISO-2500, cropped to 4371 pixels on width
Olympus OM-D E-M1X + M.Zuiko 75-300 mm f/4.8-6.7 II @ 300 mm, efov 600 mm, f/6.7, 1/1600, ISO-2500, cropped to 4112 pixels on width
Olympus OM-D E-M1X + M.Zuiko 75-300 mm f/4.8-6.7 II @ 300 mm, efov 600 mm, f/6.7, 1/1600, ISO-2500, cropped to 4447 pixels on width
Olympus OM-D E-M1X + M.Zuiko 75-300 mm f/4.8-6.7 II @ 300 mm, efov 600 mm, f/6.7, 1/1600, ISO-2500, cropped to 4354 pixels on width
Olympus OM-D E-M1X + M.Zuiko 75-300 mm f/4.8-6.7 II @ 300 mm, efov 600 mm, f/6.7, 1/1600, ISO-2500, cropped to 4283 pixels on width
Olympus OM-D E-M1X + M.Zuiko 75-300 mm f/4.8-6.7 II @ 300 mm, efov 600 mm, f/6.7, 1/1600, ISO-2500, cropped to 4411 pixels on width

Great Blue Herons can be very territorial and aggressive behaviour between individual birds can sometimes ensue. Before hostilities break out the birds will often signal their intent with a threat display.

Olympus OM-D E-M1X + M.Zuiko 75-300 mm f/4.8-6.7 II @ 300 mm, efov 600 mm, f/6.7, 1/1600, ISO-2500, cropped to 4548 pixels on width

Outstretched wings accompanied by a raised neck and up-tilted head is a classic threat display.

Olympus OM-D E-M1X + M.Zuiko 75-300 mm f/4.8-6.7 II @ 300 mm, efov 600 mm, f/6.7, 1/1600, ISO-3200, cropped to 3481 pixels on width

I was treated to some very nice light during my morning visit. This enabled a couple of additional opportunities to capture images of herons coming in to land.

Olympus OM-D E-M1X + M.Zuiko 75-300 mm f/4.8-6.7 II @ 300 mm, efov 600 mm, f/6.7, 1/1600, ISO-1600, cropped to 3565 pixels on width

Rather than only focus on herons in flight, I also used the M.Zuiko 75-300 mm f/4.8-6.7 II to capture some photographs of standing birds as you can see in the following four images.

Olympus OM-D E-M1X + M.Zuiko 75-300 mm f/4.8-6.7 II @ 300 mm, efov 600 mm, f/6.7, 1/125, ISO-125
Olympus OM-D E-M1X + M.Zuiko 75-300 mm f/4.8-6.7 II @ 300 mm, efov 600 mm, f/6.7, 1/1600, ISO-1600, cropped to 4467 pixels on width
Olympus OM-D E-M1X + M.Zuiko 75-300 mm f/4.8-6.7 II @ 300 mm, efov 600 mm, f/6.7, – 0.3 step, 1/640, ISO-400
Olympus OM-D E-M1X + M.Zuiko 75-300 mm f/4.8-6.7 II @ 300 mm, efov 600 mm, f/6.7, -0.7 step, 1/1600, ISO-640, cropped to 4241 pixels on height

Towards the end of my visit I had the chance to photograph Great Blue Herons in flight. In the photograph below you can see that the bird was approaching me on a bit of an angle.

Olympus OM-D E-M1X + M.Zuiko 75-300 mm f/4.8-6.7 II @ 300 mm, efov 600 mm, f/6.7, 1/1600, ISO-1250, cropped to 4201 pixels on width

The last image in this article was a pretty aggressive crop of about 39% on the width (i.e. 3161 pixels from 5184 pixels).  As with the other the bird photographs that I’ve captured with the M.Zuiko 75-300 mm f/4.8-6.7 II thus far, I was pleased with the image quality from this cost affordable, lightweight telephoto zoom lens.

Olympus OM-D E-M1X + M.Zuiko 75-300 mm f/4.8-6.7 II @ 300 mm, efov 600 mm, f/6.7, 1/1600, ISO-320, cropped to 3161 pixels on width

If you are considering the M.Zuiko 75-300 mm f/4.8-6.7 II you may like to see my earlier article that featured osprey in flight captured with this telephoto zoom lens. The M.Zuiko 75-300 mm f/4.8-6.7 II will appeal to photographers looking for a small, lightweight and cost affordable telephoto zoom lens. It provides an equivalent field-of-view of 150-600 mm. This lens is not weather-proof.

We own the M.Zuiko 75-300 f/4.8-6.7 II with which the photographs in this article were captured.

Technical Note

Photographs were captured hand-held using camera gear as noted in the EXIF data. Images were produced from RAW files using my standard process. Most photographs were cropped to taste, then resized for web use. The degree of any cropping done is detailed in the EXIF data.

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13 thoughts on “M.Zuiko 75-300 Heron Images”

  1. Great test of the lens with some great results, especially at very slow shutter speeds.

    The high ISO captures seem very clear, assuming you applied some noise reduction, what did you use?

    Thanks for the review

    1. Hi Jim,

      I used my standard process with DxO PhotoLab 2 with its PRIME noise reduction as my main RAW processor. Then I exported a DNG file into PhotoShop CS6 for some adjustments, and also in the Nik Collection. I applied Topaz Denoise AI at the end of the process. I find that doing noise reduction twice in my multi-program process works very well for me.

      Tom

  2. Tom,

    Most interesting set for me as far as the blue heron is concerned. The sequence of flying then landing shows how the bird moves to “slow down and create drag” then “brake” for a splash-free landing. I especially dig it that the sequences you share gives us readers a split-second (literally) slice of how birds fly, glide, prepare for landing, takeoff.

    Oggie
    http://www.lagalog.com

    1. Thanks Oggie!

      This was one of those unexpected situations where I was anticipating that the bird would fly left to right. At Hendrie this is the typical flight path taken by herons. So, I was planning on panning with the heron as it flew over the surface of the water. Instead, it flew in the opposite direction over the berm, and at an angle which made photographs basically impossible (everyone has a sufficient number of photographs of the backsides of birds in flight 🙂 ). Surprisingly the heron banked around and came back in to land at basically the same spot that it had just vacated. Needless to say it was greeted with with a barrage of shutter clicks from the photographers in the area.

      Tom

      1. Tom,

        I love role playing and I can only imagine “anthromorphizing” what the blue heron could be thinking — hey, I’m being stalked by people so what if I bank around and come back to where I came from? Reminded me of a BBC Earth video I saw of a lyrebird imitating not only shutter clicks but also a camera motor drive (www.youtube.com/watch?v=mSB71jNq-yQ). Must be where this subject of Sir David Attenborough got the camera imitation act from 😀

        Oggie
        http://www.lagalog.com

          1. Tom,

            Could be 😀 On another note but still on the topic of birds, one profound effect of the lockdown and quarantine in our city (Metro Manila) is the incursion of birds not commonly seen further inland in densely-populated areas (I thought I spotted a Brahminy Kite on a mall rooftop and up close, captured shots of a Black Crowned Night Heron at another mall’s park pond espying a meal of kois). Anyway, the term “bird brain” is turning out to be a falsity when used to connote little in terms of intelligence.

            Oggie
            http://www.lagalog.com

            1. Hi Oggie,

              Sadly habitat loss has been having a negative effect on many bird species in North America. During the COVID-19 lock down earlier in the spring some photographers I know did report quite a few more sightings of bald eagles and ospreys than in past years. So, perhaps all is not lost.

              One can learn much about human behaviour by watching birds and other animals.

              Tom

  3. Thomas,

    Just received my new Olympus OM D 1 Miii. After using a Sony hybrid for years, somewhat overwhelmed with buttons, dials and menu! Suggestions for you tubes, books, etc? BTW, two lenses, 12-100mm and 100-400mm. Retired, in my 70’s, photography my favorite hobby.! Thanks!

    Best,
    Richard

    1. Hi Richard,

      Get ready for hours of enjoyment with your new Olympus gear! It may take a bit of time to get used to the menu, settings etc.

      The first thing that I did was print off a copy of the Owner’s Manual. I refer to this periodically as I need to understand where to find specific features.

      Olympus has some good starter information on its website:

      https://learnandsupport.getolympus.com/learn-center/get-to-know-your-camera/getting-started-with-your-om-d-e-m1-mark-iii

      https://learnandsupport.getolympus.com/learn-center/photography-tips/settings

      https://learnandsupport.getolympus.com/

      There are a number of people that have good information on a wide range of subjects on their YouTube channels:

      Joseph Ellis
      Joe Edelman
      Gavin Hoey
      Tim Boyer
      Robin Wong

      I’m sure readers have additional suggestions.’

      Great choice of lenses! They will give you exceptional focal length coverage, especially if you add the MC-14 and possibly the MC-20 for the M.Zuiko 100-400. We just ordered the same two lenses. The PRO 12-100 f/4 has arrived but we still waiting on the 100-400.

      Tom

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