Nikon 1 Versus Olympus for Bird Photography

Over the past couple of days I’ve received a number of personal emails asking me about using Nikon 1 versus Olympus for bird photography. The intent of this article is to describe my experiences using both camera systems. This is a very extensive article, so grab yourself a cup of coffee… or make a pot of tea… and be prepared to spend some time.

NOTE: Click on images to enlarge.

Nikon 1 V3 + Nikon 1 CX 70-300 mm f/4.5-5.6 @ 254 mm, efov 686 mm, f/5.6, 1/1600, ISO-200

Let’s be clear upfront that this article is not intended to comment on the use of other camera systems and formats. I came to the conclusion over 5 years ago that I much prefer using smaller sensor cameras, and I have no need or interest in using APS-C or full frame gear. That is my personal preference and does not mean that larger sensor cameras may not be the best choice for other photographers.

Nikon 1 V3 + 1 Nikon CX 70-300 mm @ 220 mm, efov 594 mm, f/5.6, 1/3200, ISO-450

The information in this article is simply my experience working with specific cameras and lenses. As regular readers know this is not a camera gear review site. There are plenty of other websites that do an excellent job producing that kind of content. I have never had an interest in producing this kind of material. I would much rather get to know my camera gear and share real life images and my experiences with my readers.

Nikon 1 V3 + 1 Nikkor CX 70-300 mm f/4.5-5.6 @ 132 mm, efov 356 mm, f/5.6, 1/1600, ISO-640

Overall Nikon 1 Impression

For photographers looking for a small, lightweight birding kit that provides an excellent balance of size, weight, and reach there really is nothing that matches a Nikon 1 V2 or V3 paired up with a 1 Nikkor CX 70-300 mm f/4.5-5.6 zoom lens. This combination truly is a ‘shoot all day’ solution.

Nikon 1 V2 + 1 Nikon CX 70-300 mm f/4.5-5.6 @ 201 mm, efov 543 mm, f/5.6, 1/1600, ISO-250, captured at 15 frames per second

The Nikon 1 camera system was discontinued by Nikon back in July 2018. If anyone wants to get into this system, they would need to search the used camera market.

Nikon 1 V2 + 1 Nikon CX 70-300 mm f/4.5-5.6 @ 300 mm, efov 810 mm, f/5.6, 1/8000, ISO-4000

Current owners of Nikon 1, and specifically the 1 Nikkor CX 70-300 mm f/4.5-5.6 zoom lens, seldom part with their gear. They realize that there is nothing else on the market that provides them with the same combination of size/weight/reach.

Nikon 1 V3 + 1 Nikkor CX 70-300 mm f/4.5-5.6 @ 300 mm, efov 810 mm, f/5.6, 1/1250, ISO-200

Many Nikon 1 owners have added additional bodies, back-up copies of lenses and additional batteries to extend the usable life of their gear. Folks who love the Nikon 1 format are often loathe to part with their camera equipment.

Olympus OM-D E-M1X + M.Zuiko PRO 40-150 mm f/2.8 with M.Zuiko MC-20 teleconverter @ 300 mm, efov 600 mm, f/5.6, 1/2500, ISO-3200, Pro Capture H, subject distance 8 metres

Overall Olympus Impression

Shooting with Olympus camera gear, specifically the OM-D E-M1X (as well as the OM-D E-M1 Mark III with which I currently only have limited experience), expands bird photography into new and exciting territory.

Olympus OM-D E-M1X + M.Zuiko 40-150 mm f/2.8 with M.Zuiko 1.4X teleconverter @ 210 mm, efov 420 mm, f/6.3, 1/4000, ISO-640, subject distance 8.5 metres

OM-D cameras that have Pro Capture technology open up so much additional potential for a photographer to confidently capture precise action moments. It is technology that I use all the time, and I am still amazed every time that I use.

Olympus OM-D E-M1X + M.Zuiko 75-300 mm f/4.8-6.7 @ 215 mm, efov 430 mm, f/6.7, 1/1600, ISO-640

We need to keep in mind that doing a Nikon 1 versus Olympus comparison is not an apples-to-apples situation. Sensor sizes are different. The size and weight of the gear is different. The technology is different. And the investment required to shoot with each system is different.

Olympus OM-D E-M1X + M.Zuiko PRO 40-150 mm f/2.8 with M.Zuiko MC-20 teleconverter @ 300 mm, efov 600 mm, f/5.6, 1/2500, ISO-3200, Pro Capture H mode

Suffice to say that unless my specific intent is to create new content for my Nikon 1 readers, my preferred choice of camera gear when doing bird photography is my Olympus kit. Shooting with Olympus equipment is a totally different experience than using Nikon 1 for a number of reasons that this article will discuss. Once I receive my M.Zuiko 100-400 f/5-6.3 IS zoom lens, I imagine that my bird photography will expand dramatically.

Nikon 1 V3 + 1 Nikon CX 70-300 mm f/4.5-5.6 @ 152 mm, efov 410 mm, f/5.6, 1/1600, ISO-560

Balance of Size, Weight and Reach: Nikon 1

As noted earlier, if a photographer is looking for a small, lightweight capable camera system that provides excellent reach, Nikon 1 is an excellent solution. End of story.

Olympus OM-D E-M1X + M.Zuiko PRO 40-150 mm f/2.8 with M.Zuiko MC-20 teleconverter @ 300 mm, efov 600 mm, f/7.1, 1/1600, ISO-800

Auto-focus Performance: Olympus

Without question I have been able to capture images of birds-in-flight with my Olympus kit that I would have missed with my Nikon 1 gear. It locks on much faster under a range of lighting conditions. The number of auto-focusing options and settings with Olympus gear are plentiful which creates a steeper learning curve. These options give photographers the ability to customize their gear to suit their shooting style and preferences.

Olympus OM-D E-M1X + M.Zuiko PRO 40-150 f/2.8 with M.Zuiko MC-20 teleconverter @ 300 mm, efov 600 mm, f/5.6, 1/1600, ISO-2500

Some of these adjustments include auto-focus sensitivity and the creation of customized auto-focus grid patterns. Sometime in 2020 Olympus will be launching Bird Detection AI for my E-M1X. This has the potential to take my bird photography to a completely different level of performance.

Olympus OM-D E-M1X + M.Zuiko PRO 40-150 mm f/2.8 with M.Zuiko MC-20 teleconverter @ 200 mm, efov 400 mm, f/5.6, 1/25, ISO-12800

Focusing in very low light is superior with Olympus. That’s not to say that Nikon 1 gear is bad… it’s not. About 5 years ago I owned a Panasonic GH4 and a couple of their pro zoom lens. I returned all of it after about 10 days of use, and paid a small restocking fee. One of the primary reasons that I returned it was that the auto-focusing performance of my Nikon 1 kit was far superior, especially in low light.

Olympus OM-D E-M1X + M.Zuiko 75-300 mm f/4.8-6.7 @ 300 mm, efov 600 mm, f/6.7, 1/1600, ISO-2500, cropped to 4457 pixels on width

Ergonomics and Handling: Olympus

Even though my E-M1X is much larger and heavier than my Nikon 1 bodies, it is a joy to use. The availability of identically positioned, external controls in either a vertical or horizontal orientation is excellent. I can make necessary camera adjustments ‘on the fly’ without needing to take my eye away from the viewfinder.

Olympus OM-D E-M1X + M.Zuiko PRO 40-150 mm f/2.8 with M.Zuiko MC-20 teleconverter @ 284 mm, efov 568 mm, f/6.3, 1/3200, ISO-6400, Pro Capture H mode, subject distance 8.2 metres

My E-M1X (and some other OM-D bodies) allow for custom camera settings to be programmed and accessed by the top dial on the body. I have four sets of custom bird photography settings programmed on one of my E-M1X bodies. This allows me to go from photographing an approaching bird-in-flight, to a Pro Capture image opportunity by simply changing my top dial. After some practice, I can now select any of my four custom setting modes without having to look down at my camera.

Olympus OM-D E-M1X + M.Zuiko PRO 40-150 mm f/2.8 with M.Zuiko MC-20 teleconverter @ 300 mm, efov 600 mm, f/8, 1/4000, ISO-1000, Pro Capture H mode, subject distance 4.8 metres

Until a photographer experiences how quickly shooting modes can be changed, it is difficult to appreciate how many additional bird images are made possible. My Olympus kit has allowed me to capture photographs that other folks missed as they were fumbling around in their menus. I often missed bird photographs with my Nikon 1 gear while adjusting various settings.

Splash from waves hitting retaining wall about to hit my Olympus OM-D E-M1X and M.Zuiko PRO 40-150 mm f/2,8 with MC-20 teleconverter

Weathersealing: Olympus

The OM-D E-M1X (and some other Olympus cameras) have an IPX1 weathersealing rating. I have been out in inclement weather that has driven every non-Olympus photographer under cover, or to their cars. A good selection of M.Zuiko lenses also have excellent weathersealing, as do the Olympus flashes that I own. This allows me to photograph birds and other subjects in inclement weather with complete confidence. Recently I had several gallons of water pour down from the tarp on my pergola. It drenched me and my Olympus gear with no ill effect.

Olympus OM-D E-M1X + M.Zuiko PRO 40-150 mm f/2.8 with M.Zuiko MC-20 teleconverter @ 300 mm, efov 600 mm, f/8, -0.7 step,1/2500, ISO-1600, Pro Capture H mode

All of the videos you’ve watched, or articles that you have read, about Olympus owners cleaning their IPX1 rated cameras by putting them under their kitchen faucets are true. Obviously the camera body needs to have an appropriately weathersealed M.Zuiko lens affixed to it!

Olympus OM-D E-M1X + M.Zuiko 40-150 mm f/2.8 with M.Zuiko MC-20 teleconverter @ 300 mm, efov 600 mm, f/5.6, 1/15, ISO-2000

Image Stabilization: Olympus

The Vibration Control on my 1 Nikkor CX 70-300 mm f/4.5-5.6 is quite good and I have been able to regularly capture bird images at slower shutter speeds. Shooting with an E-M1X or E-M1 Mark III takes image stabilization to a different level for both bird photography and other genres. The IBIS (in body image stabilization) with these cameras is rated for 7 stops. Obviously bird movement can limit the use of slow shutter speeds. The Olympus IBIS system has allowed me to regularly capture multiple second handheld landscape images.

OM-D E-M1X + M.Zuiko PRO 40-150 mm f/2.8 with M.Zuiko MC-20 teleconverter @ 300 mm, efov 600 mm, f/5.6, -0.3 EV, 1/2500, ISO-500, cropped to 3928 pixels

Overall Sensor Performance: Olympus

Physics simply are what they are. There’s no dispute that a full frame camera will have better dynamic range and colour depth when compared to a M4/3 sensor camera. The same is true when comparing the sensor in a Nikon 1 V-series camera with an E-M1X or similar current generation OM-D camera.

Olympus OM-D E-M1X + M.Zuiko PRO 40-150 mm f/2.8 @ 150 mm, efov 300 mm, f/3.5, 1/200, ISO-10000, subject distance 2.7 metres

Low Light Performance: Olympus

While not matching the low light performance of a full frame camera, my E-M1X and E-M1 Mark III bodies outperform my Nikon 1 kit. The files are easier to work with in post, and as mentioned earlier, sensor size is impacted by physics which directly affects low light image performance.

Olympus OM-D E-M1X + M.Zuiko PRO 40-150 mm f/2.8 with M.Zuiko MC-20 teleconverter @ 120 mm, efov 240 mm, f/5.6, 1/2000, ISO-3200, Pro Capture Hi mode, subject distance 2.8 metres

Auto Sensor Cleaning: Olympus

It was pretty easy to clean the sensors in my Nikon 1 camera bodies using an Eyelead Sensor Gel Stick. It would literally take less than 30 seconds to do.  The Supersonic Wave Filter in my OM-D cameras vibrate 30,000 times per second and shakes dust and debris off the sensor every time the camera is turned on.

Olympus OM-D E-M1X + M.Zuiko PRO 40-150 mm f/2.8 with MC-20 teleconverter, 180 mm, efov 360 mm, f/8, 1/250, ISO-200, Olympus FL-700 WR Flash used, subject distance 1.5 metres

It works incredibly well. During 18 months of use, I have never once had to clean the sensor in my original E-M1X.  If you change lenses while out in the field, not having to worry about dust on your camera’s sensor makes a difference. Not only does it create piece of mind, it potentially eliminates a lot of work in post.

Olympus OM-D E-M1X + M.Zuiko PRO 40-150 mm f/2.8 plus M.Zuiko MC-20 teleconverter @ 104 mm, efov 208 mm, f/5.6, 1/2500, ISO-6400, Pro Capture H mode, subject distance 3.6 metres

Precise Moment Photography: Olympus

While Nikon 1 gear has Best Moment Capture its functionality does not come close to what is possible when using Pro Capture with an Olympus camera.

Olympus OM-D E-M1X + M.Zuiko PRO 40-150 mm f/2.8 with M.Zuiko MC-20 teleconverter @ 80 mm, efov 160 mm, f/5.6, 1/1000, ISO-1600, Pro Capture H mode

Buffer and Card Writing Speed: Olympus

The buffer size on a Nikon 1 V2 or V3 is actually quite good compared to many other cameras. Even when using fast cards it is common to have to wait for the buffer to clear on a Nikon 1 body. Often when I was out doing bird-in-flight photography I would take a Nikon 1 V2 and a V3 both equipped with a 1 Nikkor CX 70-300 mm f/4.5-5.6. This allowed me to fill the buffer on one camera, then immediately switch to the second camera to photograph more action. This came in very handy when capturing certain types of bird behaviour such as an osprey fishing.

Olympus OM-D E-M1X with M.Zuiko PRO 40-150 mm f/2.8 and M.Zuiko M20 teleconverter @ 300 mm, efov 600 mm, f/5.6, 1/4000, ISO-1250, subject distance 43.6 metres

My E-M1X has dual card slots both of which utilize fast UHS-II memory cards. It also has dual TruePicTM VIII processors so card writing is very fast. Thus far I’ve not had to wait for the buffer in my E-M1X to clear. This allows me to keep shooting, even successive Pro Capture runs.

Olympus OM-D E-M1X + M.Zuiko PRO 40-150 mm f/2.8 with M.Zuiko MC-20 teleconverter @ 300 mm, efov 600 mm, f/8, 1/1600, ISO-1250

Heat Dissipation: Olympus

During heavy use of my Nikon 1 gear on hot summer days, the camera bodies would occasionally overheat. Then, I’d have to wait for 10-15 minutes for it to cool off enough to resume use. My E-M1X has an internal heat sync pipe that is liquid filled. This heat pipe dissipates heat from inside the camera body to the upper portion of the body casting. This allows for extended, rigorous use without the worry of the camera overheating.

Olympus OM-D E-M1X + M.Zuiko PRO 40-150 mm f/2.8 @150 mm, efov 300 mm, f/4, 1/500, ISO-2000, Handheld Hi Res mode

Handheld High Resolution: Olympus

One of the unique features that I occasionally use for bird photography is the Handheld Hi Res mode. This is available on both the E-M1X and E-M1 Mark III. Since this shooting mode requires a subject to be quite still it is most effectively used with larger perched birds, or those that are resting. The amount of detail that the Handheld Hi Res mode can produce is quite amazing with its 50 MP RAW files.

Olympus OM-D E-M1X + M.Zuiko PRO 40-150 mm f/2.8 with M.Zuiko MC-20 teleconverter @ 300 mm, efov 600 mm, f/5.6, 1/3200, ISO-2500, Pro Capture H mode, subject distance 4.2 metres

Equivalent Field-of-View: Olympus/Nikon 1

The 1 Nikkor CX 70-300 mm f/4.5-5.6 is a wonderfully small lens given its equivalent field-of-view (efov) of 189-810 mm. This beats the M.Zuiko 75-300 mm f/4.8-6.7 with its efov of 150-600 mm. The 1 Nikkor CX 70-300 mm f/4.5-5.6 also performs better optically than the M.Zuiko 75-300 mm f/4.8-6.7. At this point my favourite M.Zuiko lens for birding is the PRO 40-150 mm f/2.8 with the MC-20 teleconverter. This provides users with an efov of 160-600 mm at f/5.6. Optically this combination performs better than the 1 Nikkor CX 70-300 mm f/4.5-5.6.

Oyster catcher in flight, Tairua New Zealand, Nikon 1 V3 + 1 Nikkor CX 70-300 mm f/4.5-5.6 @ 220 mm, efov 594 mm, f/5.6, 1/1250, ISO-500

The recently introduced M.Zuiko 100-400 mm f/5-6.3 super-telephoto zoom provides an efov of 200-800 mm. It is also compatible with the M.Zuiko MC-14 teleconverter. This extends the efov of the lens to 280-1120 mm at f/9. The M.Zuiko MC-20 teleconverter can also be used which would further extend the efov to 400-1600 mm at f/13.

Olympus OM-D E-M1X + M.Zuiko PRO 40-150 mm f/2.8 and M.Zuiko MC-20 teleconverter @ 212 mm, efov 424 mm, f/6.3, 1/2000, ISO-2500, Pro Capture H Mode, subject distance 6.3 metres

The M.Zuiko PRO 150-400 mm f/4.5 TC1.25X IS PRO lens will be released in the winter of 2020 (think northern hemisphere). It will provide bird photographers with an efov of 187.5-1000 mm at f/5.6 when the built-in 1.25 teleconverter is used. Another option is attaching the M.Zuiko MC-20 teleconverter. This further expands the efov to 375-2000 mm (at f/11 when fully extended) in a package that can be used handheld for maximum flexibility.

Young chick near Haruru Falls, New Zealand, Nikon 1 V3 + 1 Nikkor CX 70-300 mm f/4.5-5.6 @ 300 mm, efov 810 mm, f/5.6, 1/250, ISO-100

Nikon 1 owners can use the FT-1 adapter which allows them to use a variety of Nikon F-Mount lenses. Given the small size of the Nikon 1 V2 and V3 bodies it can be difficult to shoot large F-Mount lenses handheld when using the FT-1 adapter… but very long equivalent fields-of-view are possible. Many Nikon 1 owners use a monopod or tripod with using a heavy F-Mount lens with the FT-1 adapter and a Nikon 1 body.

Olympus OM-D E-M1X + M.Zuiko PRO 40-150 mm f/2.8 with MC-20 teleconverter @ 300 mm, efov 600 mm, f/5.6, 1/3200, ISO-2500, Pro Capture H mode, subject distance 6.8 metres

Frame Rates: Olympus

Both Nikon 1 and Olympus camera bodies offer users some terrific frame rates including up to 60 frames-per-second with the first frame locking focus and exposure for the balance of the run. When using continuous auto-focus the Nikon 1 V3 can shoot up to 20 frames-per-second, compared to 18 frames-per-second with the E-M1X or E-M1 Mark III.

Olympus OM-D E-M1X + M.Zuiko PRO 40-150 mm f/2.8 with M.Zuiko MC-20 teleconverter @ 170 mm, efov 340 mm, f/5.6, 1/80, ISO-1000, subject distance 1.3 metres

An important difference when using OM-D cameras is that a photographer gets the benefit of fast frame rates along with shooting with silent shutter. This is often a critical factor when trying to keep birds and wildlife calm and undisturbed when photographing them.

Nikon 1 V3 + 1 Nikkor CX 70-300 mm f/4.5-5.6 @ 155 mm, efov 418.5 mm, f/5.6, 1/1250, ISO-1100

Cost: Nikon 1

Since the Nikon 1 system is discontinued photographers can purchase used equipment for quite affordable prices. For someone getting started with bird photography buying used Nikon 1 gear can make a lot of sense. The challenge is in finding some good, used gear.

Olympus OM-D E-M1X + M.Zuiko PRO 40-150 mm f/2.8 with M.Zuiko MC-20 teleconverter @ 300 mm, efov 600 mm, f/5.6, 1/1600, ISO-1250, Pro Capture H mode, subject distance 6.9 metres

Sale of Olympus Imaging to JIP

The Olympus Imaging division is in the process of being transferred to OM Digital Solutions, a company created by Japan Industrial Partners, Inc.. This transaction is scheduled to be completed by the end of 2020. No one really knows what the long term future is of OM-D cameras and M.Zuiko lenses. Nor do we know what the impact of this change in ownership may do to the price of these products, as well as the resale value of used Olympus camera gear.

Olympus OM-D E-M1X + M.Zuiko PRO 40-150mm f/2.8 with MC-20 teleconverter @ 300mm, efov 600mm, f/5.6, 1/2500, ISO-1000, Pro Capture L, subject distance 28.6 metres

There are some very attractive prices currently in effect for Olympus cameras, lenses and accessories. These offers will likely be short-lived given the approaching completion date of the sale of the Olympus Imaging division.

Olympus OM-D E-M1X + M.Zuiko PRO 40-150 mm f/2.8 with M.Zuiko MC-20 teleconverter @ 300 mm, efov 600 mm, f/5.6, 1/800, ISO-4000, subject distance 3.4 metres

Summary

Using a smaller sensor camera system to photograph birds can make sense for a lot of photographers. For the folks who want a small, lightweight, capable and cost affordable solution, choosing Nikon 1 gear is an excellent choice.

Nikon 1 V3 + 1 Nikkor 70-300 mm f/4.5-5.6 @ 300 mm, efov 810 mm, f/5.6, 1/2000, ISO-1000

Comparing Nikon 1 versus Olympus for bird photography is more than just using a small, cost affordable system for many people. Photographers wanting more rugged gear that provides them with a host of advantages will recognize the benefits that come with using OM-D bodies and M.Zuiko lenses.

Olympus OM-D E-M1X + M.Zuiko 40-150 mm f/2.8 with M.Zuiko MC-20 teleconverter @ 300 mm, efov 600 mm, f/5.6, 1/60, ISO-500

If you’ve been comparing Nikon 1 versus Olympus for your bird photography needs, hopefully this extensive article has been helpful for you. Only you can decide what camera gear best meets your needs. It could be Nikon 1, Olympus, or some other brand and camera format.

Olympus OM-D E-M1X + M.Zuiko PRO 40-150 mm f/2.8 with M.Zuiko MC-20 teleconverter @ 194 mm, efov 388 mm, f/5.6, 1/1600, ISO-6400, Pro Capture mode, subject distance 8.6 metres

Technical Note

Photographs were captured hand-held using camera gear as noted in the EXIF data. Images were produced from RAW files using my standard process.

Olympus OM-D E-M1X + M.Zuiko 40-150 mm f/2.8 with M.Zuiko MC-20 teleconverter @ 300 mm, efov 600 mm, f/5.6, 1/30, ISO-100

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8 thoughts on “Nikon 1 Versus Olympus for Bird Photography”

  1. Wonderfully illustrated article and lots to think about. Just have to allude to Ming Thien’s review of the original E-M1 (back in 2013!) when he tested the weather sealing in a rigorous way under a hot shower for 10 minutes in 1 cm of standing water and shooting it at the same time – camera body and the 14-40 Pro lens never missed a beat. Never seen any other brands let a reviewer do that! That is one of top reasons why I buy Olympus.

    1. Hi Mark,

      🙂 I’ve never put my E-M1X bodies to that kind of rigorous test!

      I know that Olympus has allowed a number of gear reviewers to pour water over their weathersealed equipment for their reviews. I’ve been caught in some very wet, inclement weather a number of times and never let it bother me. All of the other photographers ran for cover or to their cars, while I could just keep on shooting. Until people actually experience the quality of Olympus weathersealing it is hard to explain how liberating this feature can be.

      Tom

  2. I believe some of the Nikon1 range are not equipped with viewfinders, just a screen. Can you comment on this as it relates to bird photography. I find it very hard to keep my Oly M1.2 steady and pointing at the subject when using the screen and always use the eyepiece alternative when using long focal length lenses.

    1. Hi Colin,

      V-series Nikon 1 cameras are the only ones where cameras have an EVF. Both the J-series and S-series do not have EVFs.

      When photographing wild birds I almost always use the EVF of my camera. With birds-in-flight this is something that I always do. I guess I’m ‘old school’ but I find it very difficult to track a bird using the rear screen of a camera. For other subject matter I often compose handheld images using the rear screen of my camera. The handheld macro photography that I do is most often done using the rear screen of a camera. I find the articulating screen of the E-M1X ideal for this type of photography.

      Tom

  3. Tom, in February 2020 I bought two E-M1X cameras and one EM-1 M3 camera. Are you satisfied with having the M1X and the M3 instead of two M1X cameras? I have “medium” sized hands where the M3 feels small (switchology a little clumsy in comparison to M1X’s. I use the RRS Modular Lower Plate for the M3 so my pinky finger isn’t off the camera) and the E1X feels slightly large, but easily used. Your personal opinion, are you happy with buying the M3 instead of another M1X? It’s time for me to make up my mind and to sell one M1X or the M3. Your thoughts? (BTW, I sold all my V1, V2, and V3 cameras and just kept two J5’s with just the 10-100 lens).

    1. Hi Michael,

      Actually I have 2 E-M1X camera bodies… both bought in 2019. I bought the first one in July 2019, then added a second E-M1X in December. They are the best cameras that I’ve ever owned and I love using them. I have one set up specifically for birds-in-flight and the other one is for other types of subject matter (HHHR, Live ND, video, handheld focus stacking).

      My wife and I recently added to our Olympus kit and bought an E-M1 Mark III primarily for her to use, and a couple of small, light M.Zuiko zoom lenses for her use.

      I have large hands and I don’t find the E-M1 Mark III very comfortable to use. I also much prefer the ergonomics and handling of the E-M1X. I wouldn’t part with either one of my E-M1X bodies.

      Tom

      1. Tom,

        I’m inclined to keep both M1X’s and sell the M3. My wife has a M3 of her own. I also feel that the M1X is the best camera I’ve ever had. In spite of how good any of the FF DSLRs, or mirrorless are, and I had them for years, the M1X is just the best camera I’ve ever had. Being 66 yrs old, I won’t need anything but the M1X. Thanks for the advice and inspiration!

        1. Hi Mike,

          Hopefully the M.Zuiko 100-400 mm f/5-6.3 IS that I ordered a couple of months ago will arrive within the next week or two. I think that lens will open up a lot more birding/nature opportunities for me, especially when used with the MC-14 and MC-20 teleconverters. The Bird Detection AI that Olympus announced would be introduced before year end could be a game changer in terms of photographing birds-in-flight.

          🙂 You may feel like I do… the E-M1X is a ‘go anywhere, photograph anything, under any kind of condition’ camera. What more could a photographer want?

          Tom

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