Canadian Warplane Heritage Museum

Late last week I had the opportunity to visit the Canadian Warplane Heritage Museum.  Many people who visit the greater Toronto area have no idea that this facility even exists. With almost 50 vintage aircraft on display, the Canadian Warplane Heritage Museum will be of interest to aircraft enthusiasts.

NOTE: Click on images to enlarge.

Olympus OM-D E-M1X + M.Zuiko PRO 12-40 mm f/2.8 @ 26 mm, efov 52 mm, f/4, 1/30, ISO-800, subject distance 27.9 metres

The aircraft on display all have information panels that provide a summary of facts about the aircraft.

Olympus OM-D E-M1X + M.Zuiko PRO 12-40 mm f/2.8 @ 16 mm, efov 32 mm, f/4, 1/30, ISO-800, subject distance 1.5 metres

If you’re like me, you’ll always find interesting details to photograph when around aircraft and other mechanical creations.

Olympus OM-D E-M1X + M.Zuiko PRO 12-40 mm f/2.8 @ 40 mm, efov 80 mm, f/5.6, 1/30, ISO-2500, subject distance 895 mm

Like other similar museum facilities it can be a challenge to find a good shooting angle to separate an individual aircraft from others on display.

Olympus OM-D E-M1X + M.Zuiko PRO 12-40 mm f/2.8 @ 21 mm, efov 42 mm, f/4, 1/30, ISO-640, subject distance 8.5 metres
Olympus OM-D E-M1X + M.Zuiko PRO 12-40 mm f/2.8 @ 29 mm, efov 58 mm, f/4, 1/30, ISO-320
Olympus OM-D E-M1X + M.Zuiko PRO 12-40 mm f/2.8 @ 12 mm, efov 24 mm, f/2.8, 1/30, ISO-320
Olympus OM-D E-M1X + M.Zuiko PRO 12-40 mm f/2.8 @ 16 mm, efov 32 mm, f/4, 1/30, ISO-320, subject distance 5.3 metres
Olympus OM-D E-M1X + M.Zuiko PRO 12-40 mm f/2.8 @ 14 mm, efov 28 mm, f/4, 1/40, ISO-320, subject distance 3.3 metres

Sometimes it can help to use parts of an aircraft or other elements to serve as a partial reveal in a composition.

Olympus OM-D E-M1X + M.Zuiko PRO 12-40 mm f/2.8 @ 12 mm, efov 24 mm, f/5.6, 1/30, ISO-1250, subject distance 960 mm
Olympus OM-D E-M1X + M.Zuiko PRO 12-40 mm f/2.8 @ 20 mm, efov 40 mm, f/4.5, 1/30, ISO-1250, subject distance 2.7 metres

Finding interesting shooting angles can add a feeling of intimacy to a photograph.

Olympus OM-D E-M1X + M.Zuiko PRO 12-40 mm f/2.8 @ 15 mm, efov 30 mm, f/4, 1/30, ISO-100, subject distance 780 mm

Or highlight a particular wing structure…

Olympus OM-D E-M1X + M.Zuiko PRO 12-40 mm f/2.8 @ 19 mm, efov 38 mm, f/4, 1/30, ISO-250, subject distance 1.2 metres

The lighting in a facility can also add some drama to an aircraft…

Olympus OM-D E-M1X + M.Zuiko PRO 40-150 mm f/2.8 @ 55 mm, efov 110 mm, f/5, 1/100, ISO-400, subject distance 24.1 metres

My eye is always attracted to mechanical details.

Olympus OM-D E-M1X + M.Zuiko PRO 40-150 mm f/2.8 @ 70 mm, efov 140 mm, f/5.6, 1/100, ISO-6400, subject distance 3 metres
Olympus OM-D E-M1X + M.Zuiko PRO 40-150 mm f/2.8 @ 150 mm, efov 300 mm, f/2.8, 1/60, ISO-640, subject distance 2.3 metres
Olympus OM-D E-M1X + M.Zuiko PRO 40-150 mm f/2.8 @ 100 mm, efov 200 mm, f/2.8, 1/50, ISO-6400, subject distance 3.7 metres
Olympus OM-D E-M1X + M.Zuiko PRO 12-40 mm f/2.8 @ 40 mm, efov 80 mm, f/4, 1/30, ISO-2000, subject distance 680 mm

Photographing aircraft details also provides an opportunity to practice using some slow hand-held shutter speeds.

Olympus OM-D E-M1X + M.Zuiko PRO 12-40 mm f/2.8 @ 40 mm, efov 80 mm, f/5.6, 1/13, ISO-3200, subject distance 340 mm
Olympus OM-D E-M1X + M.Zuiko PRO 12-40 mm f/2.8 @ 40 mm, efov 80 mm, f/2.8, 1/6, ISO-1250, subject distance 1.1 metres
Olympus OM-D E-M1X + M.Zuiko PRO 12-40 mm f/2.8 @ 40 mm, efov 80 mm, f/2.8, 1/6, ISO-3200, subject distance 2.4 metres
Olympus OM-D E-M1X + M.Zuiko PRO 12-40 mm f/2.8 @ 40 mm, efov 80 mm, f/4, 1/15, ISO-2000, subject distance 630 mm
Olympus OM-D E-M1X + M.Zuiko PRO 40-150 mm f/2.8 @ 150 mm, efov 300 mm, f/3.5, 1/2, ISO-400, subject distance 1.4 metres

Engine cutouts always fascinate me as I love to see how various mechanical parts fit together and interact.

Olympus OM-D E-M1X + M.Zuiko PRO 40-150 mm f/2.8 @ 90 mm, efov 180 mm, f/5.6, 1/40, ISO-5000, subject distance 2.2 metres

They can also yield some abstract compositions.

Olympus OM-D E-M1X + M.Zuiko PRO 12-40 mm f/2.8 @ 40 mm, efov 80 mm, f/4.5, 1/30, ISO-2000, subject distance 540 mm
Olympus OM-D E-M1X + M.Zuiko PRO 40-150 mm f/2.8 @ 150 mm, efov 300 mm, f/5.6, 1/60, ISO-6400, subject distance 2 metres
Olympus OM-D E-M1X + M.Zuiko PRO 12-40 mm f/2.8 @ 40 mm, efov 80 mm, f/4.5, 1/30, ISO-4000, subject distance 805 mm

The paint on wings can also make for interesting, abstract compositions. I used the flip screen on my camera to capture the following image from a higher elevation to change the perspective.

Olympus OM-D E-M1X + M.Zuiko PRO 12-40 mm f/2.8 @ 29 mm, efov 58 mm, f/4, 1/30, ISO-400, subject distance 1.8 metres

The Canadian Warplane Heritage Museum has an active aircraft restoration program. From outside the restricted area, you can view various projects that are currently in progress.

Olympus OM-D E-M1X + M.Zuiko PRO 12-40 mm f/2.8 @ 12 mm, efov 24 mm, f/7.1, 1/40, ISO-1250, subject distance 9.3 metres
Olympus OM-D E-M1X + M.Zuiko PRO 12-40 mm f/2.8 @ 21 mm, efov 42 mm, f/4, 1/50, ISO-1250, subject distance 15.6 metres
Olympus OM-D E-M1X + M.Zuiko PRO 40-150 mm f/2.8 @ 40 mm, efov 80 mm, f/2.8, 1/50, ISO-1250, subject distance 3.5 metres

There are some aircraft on display outdoors. These can only be accessed with a guided tour.

Olympus OM-D E-M1X + M.Zuiko PRO 12-40 mm f/2.8 @ 31 mm, efov 62 mm, f/5.6, 1/800, ISO-250, subject distance 1.9 metres

The Canadian Warplane Heritage Museum has a virtual reality experience available, as well as a gift shop and onsite restaurant. There are a number of informative displays that can be viewed prior to entering the hangar area.

Olympus OM-D E-M1X + M.Zuiko PRO 12-40 mm f/2.8 @ 26 mm, efov 52 mm, f/4, 1/30, ISO-2500, subject distance 2.1 metres

If you find yourself in the greater Toronto area, the Canadian Warplane Heritage Museum is worth some time to visit.

Olympus OM-D E-M1X + M.Zuiko PRO 12-40 mm f/2.8 @ 21 mm, efov 42 mm, f/4, 1/30, ISO-5000, subject distance 1.4 metres

Technical Note:
All photographs were captured hand-held in available light using camera equipment noted in the EXIF data. All images were produced from RAW files using my standard process.

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4 thoughts on “Canadian Warplane Heritage Museum”

  1. Tom,
    Nice photos! I noticed you used 1/30 sec or faster shutter speeds on your images. Were you in shutter priority, aperture priority or manual mode? With the effectiveness of the IBIS and your excellent handholding technique, I would have expected you to be using much slower shutter speeds.
    Jack

    1. Hi Jack,

      I’m glad you enjoyed the images… thanks for your supportive comment!

      My E-M1X was set to Manual mode and I let my ISO float with the auto setting. My visit to the Canadian Warplane Heritage Museum was my first ever opportunity to use the M.Zuiko 12-40 mm f/2.8 PRO zoom. I selected a shutter speed of 1/30 as a ‘not have to worry about it’ shutter speed so I could concentrate on framing my images. Once I got more accustomed to the lens, I did capture a number of images as low as 1/6… some of them are in the article.

      I wasn’t really trying to test out using slow shutter speeds during my visit. I very seldom take multiple images of a subject when doing this type of photography. I used shutter speeds in which I was very confident since I’m not planning to return to the facility in the near future. My last visit was over 25 years ago!

      Tom

  2. Nice set of photos Sir Thomas. I like how you chose your focal point. Sometimes i struggle with this, my composition is right but i only find my focal point after some test shots. In fact, i have some questions for you:

    1. Do you move your focus point or just lock & recompose?

    2. Do you use back button focusing or “normal” mode?

    3. Are you “always” doing ETTR or just in extreme contrast situations?

    4. Thanks in advance!!

    1. Hi Motografia,

      Thanks for your comment… I will be happy to answer your questions.

      1) I always move my focus point to where I want it in an image. I have not needed to ‘focus and recompose’ since I started using mirrorless cameras exclusively over 4 years ago. Based on the lens, focal length and aperture I’m using, I have a good idea where I need to place my focus point.

      2) For still photography I always use ‘normal’ mode, i.e. single point auto focus.

      3) I never use ETTR with my images. I may experiment with this with my E-M1X. Currently I typically use matrix metering for still photography, unless the lighting is very tricky. In those situations I may use centre weighted or spot metering. I always use the DxO Smart Lighting Spot Weighted adjustment with all of my images in post. This allows me to adjust the dynamic range balance before I export a DNG file into CS6.

      4) You are most welcome!

      Tom

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