OM-1 Upgrade Decision

Many M4/3 photographers are facing an OM-1 upgrade decision, and other folks are seriously considering a move to M4/3 with OM System gear because of the OM-1. It really comes down to how well the OM-1 fits your specific needs and whether you can justify the purchase for the type of photography/videography that you do.

This article outlines my personal decision and is not meant to tell readers what they should, or should not do. Opening your wallet to buy new camera gear is a decision that only you can make.

NOTE: Click on images to enlarge.

OM-D E-M1X + M.Zuiko 100-400 mm f/5-6.3 IS with M.Zuiko MC-14 teleconverter @ 560 mm, efov 1120 mm, f/9, +0.3 EV, 1/2000, ISO-500, Bird Detection AI Subject Tracking, Pro Capture L, cropped to 3544 pixels on the width, subject distance 209.5 metres

Photography Genre and Style

Fundamentally the new OM-1 camera is focused primarily on nature, wildlife, sports and other outdoor photography. Especially where extreme conditions will be encountered. That’s not to say that the camera can’t be used for a wide range of other subject matter. It most certainly can.

OM-D E-M1X + M.Zuiko 100-400 mm with M.Zuiko MC-14 teleconverter @ 560 mm, efov 1120 mm, f/9, 1/1600, ISO-1600, Pro Capture L, Bird Detection AI Subject Tracking, cropped to 4243 pixels on the width, subject distance 38.5 metres

Like my E-M1X, the OM-1 appears to be a solid all round camera that can handle just about anything that a photographer can throw at it. If you already own an Olympus camera you’ll need to think about the added technology and capabilities that the OM-1 provides, and whether you actually need, and will use these features.

OM-D E-M1X + M.Zuiko PRO 12-100 mm f/4 IS @ 16 mm, efov 32 mm, f/5.6, 1/125, ISO-200, HDR version

You may find that the OM-1 offers new technologies that will expand your photographic potential to a significant degree, thus taking you into new genres that you may not have previously explored. That may justify an upgrade.

OM-D E-M1X + M.Zuiko 100-400 mm f/5-6.3 IS with M.Zuiko MC-14 teleconverter @ 560 mm, efov 1120 mm, f/9, 1/1600, ISO-1000, Pro Capture L, Bird Detection AI, cropped to 3991 pixels on the width, subject distance 38.9 metres

Sensor Dynamic Range Performance

The new OM-1 has a new 20.4 MP M4/3 stacked BSI Live MOS sensor.  There are all kinds of reviews on the internet that provide technical details on this new sensor and how it can contribute to overall camera performance. If you are thusly inclined there is a lot of material that you can read/view… so I will not duplicate any of that information here.

OM-D E-M1X + M.Zuiko 100-400 mm f/5-6.3 IS with M.Zuiko MC-14 teleconverter @ 420 mm, efov 840 mm, f/8.8, 1/2000, ISO-2000, Pro Capture L, Bird Detection AI, cropped to 3398 pixels on the width, subject distance 29.5 metres

I’m not a technically oriented photographer so I don’t do deep drives into this type of information. I do pay some attention to dynamic range performance. Since the last Olympus camera tested by DxOMark was the OM-D E-M1 Mark II, we can’t refer to this resource to compare the OM-1 with other cameras like the E-M1X or the E-M1 Mark III.

OM-D E-M1X with M.Zuiko 60 mm f/2.8 macro, f/5, 1/30, full frame capture, ISO-200, handheld in-camera focus stacking, subject distance 535 mm

So, I visited the photonstophotos website and went to the Photographic Dynamic Range Chart. The OM-1 is listed as well as the two Olympus camera models that my wife and I own, i.e. the E-M1X and E-M1 Mark III. I clicked on each of these three cameras and the website generated a dynamic range comparison graph for me. I found the resulting graph quite interesting as there was basically no discernable difference between the three cameras. You can check this out for yourself if you want to see the details.

OM-D E-M1X + M.Zuiko PRO 40-150 mm f/2.8 with M.Zuiko MC-14 teleconverter @ 210 mm, efov 420 mm, f/4, 1/80, ISO-1000, handheld in-camera focus stacking, subject distance 1.2 metres

Bill Cliff runs the photonstophotos website and I believe that he developed a comparison called the “Photographic Dynamic Range Shadow Improvement versus ISO Setting“. I opened up that comparison chart and entered the three cameras to see what I would find.

OM-D E-M1X + M.Zuiko 60 mm f/2.8 macro, f/5, 1/640, ISO-200, In-Camera Focus Stacking, subject distance 280 mm

In this case there was some difference with the OM-1, mainly from ISO-400 through to ISO-3200. I find this measurement to be very technical in nature. For people who would like some information on how to interpret the “dynamic range shadow improvement” this detailed, online comment/explanation may be of interest.

OM-D E-M1X + M.Zuiko 100-400 mm f/5-6.3 IS with M.Zuiko MC-14 teleconverter @ 359 mm, efov 718 mm, f/8.7, -0.7 EV, 1/1600, ISO-400, Bird Detection AI Subject Tracking, full frame capture, subject distance 24.8 metres

On a personal basis I don’t worry about dynamic range performance nearly as much as other photographers do. I’ve found that the IBIS performance of my E-M1X allows me to use quite slow shutter speeds handheld at base ISO-200 on a frequent basis for landscape, indoor and architectural photography where dynamic range can be more important.

Olympus OM-D E-M1X + M.Zuiko PRO 12-100 f/4 IS @ 24 mm, efov 48 mm, f/5.6, 4 seconds handheld, ISO-200

The RAW files from my E-M1X respond very well in post and are quite easy with which to work. I use DxO PhotoLab 4 with its DxO Smart Lighting Spot Weighted function, as well as a couple of other software programs. To my eye, I find this software combination helps me squeeze a sufficient amount of dynamic range out of my Olympus RAW files to more than meet my needs.

OM-D E-M1X + M.Zuiko PRO 7-14 mm f/2.8 @ 7 mm, f/2.8, 1/2000, ISO-200

In addition, lenses like the M.Zuiko PRO 7-14 mm f/2.8 can often be shot wide open and still create the deep depth-of-field that I may want in a landscape photograph. Depending on subject matter, Handheld Hi Res (HHHR) can be used which has a positive impact on dynamic range performance.

Olympus OM-D E-M1X + M.Zuiko PRO 7-14 mm f/2.8 @ 7 mm, efov 14 mm, f/4, 5 seconds handheld, ISO-200

My E-M1X gives me a number of ways to maximize the available dynamic range. Suffice to say, the dynamic range of the new sensor in the OM-1 would not be a motivating factor to prompt me to buy this camera. Of course, it could  be a different story for other photographers.

OM-D E-M1X + M.Zuiko 100-400 mm f/5-6.3 IS @ 400 mm, efov 800 mm, f/6.3, 1/2500, ISO-4000, Pro Capture H, cropped to 3581 pixels on the width, subject distance 4.8 metres

Auto Focus Performance

Many of the OM-1 reviews cite greatly improved auto focus performance as a key improvement on this camera, especially when it comes to Subject Tracking AI technology. I can’t comment on that since I will not be getting a review sample of the camera to test.

OM-D E-M1X + M.Zuiko 100-400 mm f/5-6.3 IS with M.Zuiko MC-14 teleconverter @ 560 mm, efov 1120 mm, f/9, 1/2000, ISO-800, cropped to 2658 pixels on the width, Bird Detection AI, Pro Capture L, subject distance 67.8 metres

I’ve been experimenting with my E-M1X for a long time, trying out various auto-focusing options. This resulted in me using Bird Detection AI Subject Tracking in combination with Pro Capture L, with a single AF point, as my ‘go to’ setting for birds-in-flight. The main issue I have with this camera setting is actually a good problem to have…. I get far more ‘keeper’ images than I can possibly use. The downside is that this causes a lot of extra work culling photographs in post.

OM-D E-M1X + M.Zuiko 100-400 mm f/5-6.3 IS with M.Zuiko MC-14 teleconverter @ 346 mm, efov 692 mm, f/8.6, 1/2500, ISO-640, Bird Detection AI Subject Tracking, Pro Capture L, cropped to 3978 pixels on the width, subject distance 19.5 metres

Once I return from a birds-in-flight photo session I do a quick scan through my images to identify the most promising ones to work on in post. If that initial selection has met my needs in terms of the quality and quantity of photographs I need, the balance of my images are typically deleted right away. I usually don’t even bother looking at the rest of my photographs before I hit the ‘delete’ key.

OM-D E-M1X + M.Zuiko 100-400 mm f/5-6.3 with M.Zuiko MC-14 teleconverter @ 261 mm, efov 522 mm, f/8.4, 1/4000, ISO-1250, cropped to 4320 pixels on the width, Pro Capture H, Subject distance 4.7 metres

Whether the auto-focus performance of the OM-1 is materially better than my E-M1X is basically a moot point to me. I’m more than happy with the auto-focus performance that I’m currently getting when using Bird AI in combination with Pro Capture L and a single AF point. I certainly don’t need any more ‘keepers’ than what I’m generating now. All that would mean is more culling work in post.

Low Light Performance

E-M1X + M.Zuiko PRO 40-150 mm f/2.8 with M.Zuiko MC-14 teleconverter @ 210 mm, efov 420 mm, f/5, 1/400, ISO-16000, subject distance 2.3 metres
E-M1X + M.Zuiko PRO 40-150 mm f/2.8 with M.Zuiko MC-14 teleconverter @ 210 mm, efov 420 mm, f/5, 1/400, ISO-16000, subject distance 2.3 metres, 100% crop

The OM-1 offers an expanded ISO range 2 stops higher when compared to previous Olympus cameras. On paper this looks enticing. For me, a reality check was in order. Even if I could shoot at two stops higher ISO value how likely would I actually do that? What kind of images would I want to capture at super high ISO values?

E-M1X + M.Zuiko PRO 40-150 mm f/2.8 with M.Zuiko MC-14 teleconverter @ 210 mm, efov 420 mm, f/5.6, 1/500, ISO-6400, subject distance 2.2 metres
E-M1X + M.Zuiko PRO 40-150 mm f/2.8 with M.Zuiko MC-14 teleconverter @ 210 mm, efov 420 mm, f/5.6, 1/500, ISO-6400, subject distance 2.2 metres, 100% crop

With my current E-M1X bodies I’m comfortable shooting at ISO-6400 whenever needed, and I’ll push things one stop more or higher if absolutely required. I don’t see anything changing in terms of the subject matter that I photograph or the lighting conditions under which I operate. Do I have a realistic reason why being able to shoot at ISO-51,200 or ISO-102,400 is practical for my purposes? Nope. For what I do the expanded low light performance of the OM-1 elicits little more than a shrug.

OM-D E-M1X + M.Zuiko 100-400 mm f/5-6.3 IS @ 400 mm, efov 800 mm, f/6.3, 1/4000, ISO-640, Bird Detection AI Subject Tracking, cropped to 3533 pixels on the width, distance to subject 8.8 metres

Faster Frame Rates

Without question the OM-1 offers faster frame rates in a number of areas compared to any of the earlier Olympus cameras. Being able to shoot at faster frame rates can be very important when photographing birds-in-flight and other moving subjects. There is real potential of capturing a higher number of unique, precise moment images with faster frame rates.

OM-D E-M1X + M.Zuiko 100-400 mm f/5-6.3 IS @ 400 mm, efov 800 mm, f/6.3, 1/1600, ISO-320, Bird Detection AI Subject Tracking, cropped to 3096 pixels on the height, distance to subject 16.2 metres

A couple of practical issues came into my mind when considering the potential benefits of the OM-1’s faster frame rates. The first was that my primary birding lens is the M.Zuiko 100-400 mm f/5-6.3 IS zoom. This lens isn’t compatible with all of the higher frame rate functions of the OM-1. So, I would get some potential benefits but not all of the ones offered by the camera.

OM-D E-M1X + M.Zuiko 100-400 mm f/5-6.3 IS @ 400 mm, efov 800 mm, f/6.3, 1/1600, ISO-400, Bird Detection AI Subject Tracking, cropped to 2976 pixels on the width, distance to subject 21.6 metres

The second issue is buffer performance/memory card writing speed. The OM-1 can crank out photographs at 50 frames-per-second using continuous auto-focus, and up to 120 frames per second with the first frame locking focus. This is incredibly fast. The issue isn’t the OM-1’s fast frame rates, but rather buffer management and the ability of my existing memory cards to write all of that data quickly enough.

OM-D E-M1X + M.Zuiko 100-400 mm f/5-6.3 IS @ 400 mm, efov 800 mm, f/6.3, 1/1600, ISO-250, Bird Detection AI Subject Tracking, cropped to 2794 pixels on the width, distance to subject 16.2 metres

If my existing UHS-II memory cards aren’t fast enough to handle all of that data, they will be the bottleneck in my image capturing system. and I won’t be able to fully utilize the OM-1’s fast frame rates. I could consider buying faster cards. If I did then the cost of those cards should be included in my overall purchase decision.

Splash from waves hitting retaining wall about to hit my Olympus OM-D E-M1X and M.Zuiko PRO 40-150mm f/2,8 with MC-20 teleconverter

Improved Weather Sealing.

The OM-1 and the latest lenses introduced by OM System feature IP53 weather sealing which is an improvement over IPX-1 rated equipment. Unless the OM-1 is used with IP53 rated lenses, the camera/lens combination will perform at the level of the lowest rated component.

OM-D E-M1X + M.Zuiko 100-400 mm f/5-6.3 IS with M.Zuiko MC-20 teleconverter @ 800 mm, efov 1600 mm, f/13, 1/1250, ISO-3200, cropped to 4646 pixels on the width, subject distance 2.2 metres

From a practical standpoint the full advantage of IP53 weather sealing would not be realized until a camera owner had upgraded all of their lenses to IP53 rated glass. My E-M1X bodies were tested to IPX-3 standards, but were only rated to IPX-1 by Olympus. So, I already own a camera that can perform beyond IPX-1 standards.

OM-D E-M1X + M.Zuiko 100-400 mm f/5-6.3 IS @ 400 mm, efov 800 mm, f/6.3, 1/1600, ISO-6400, Bird Detection AI Subject Tracking, subject distance 7 metres

Expanded AI Subject Tracking Capability.

The OM-1 has added some improvements to the AI Subject Tracking technology, and also added ‘Dog/Cat’ AI tracking. Through some earlier experimentation I discovered that my E-M1X bodies are already very capable when it comes to focusing in on the eye of other wildlife/animals when using Bird Detection AI Subject Tracking. I’ve used this with squirrels, dogs and cats, and plan to experiment more with this approach in the future.

OM-D E-M1X + M.Zuiko 100-400 mm f/5-6.3 IS @ 400 mm, efov 800 mm, f/6.3, 1/1600, ISO-4000, Bird Detection AI Subject Tracking, subject distance 5.1 metres

WOW Camera Decision.

As it happens I already made my WOW camera decision back in June 2019 when I purchased my first E-M1X. It was the E-M1X that broke new ground in a big WOW way. While the OM-1 appears to be a superb photographic tool, I see it as offering an array of important, but incremental enhancements, to the original WOW camera… the E-M1X.

OM-D E-M1X + M.Zuiko 100-400 mm f/5-6.3 IS with M.Zuiko MC-14 teleconverter @ 391 mm, efov 782 mm, f/8.7, 1/1600, ISO-800, Bird Detection AI Subject Tracking, cropped to 3665 pixels on the width, subject distance 43.6 metres

For photographers who currently own E-M1 Mark I, Mark II, or Mark III cameras the OM-1 represents a very enticing upgrade opportunity. Some E-M1X owners may also see sufficient added value to do an upgrade.

OM-D E-M1X + M.Zuiko 100-400 mm f/5-6.3 IS with M.Zuiko MC-14 teleconverter @ 560 mm, efov 1120 mm, f/9, 1/4000, ISO-4000, Pro Capture H, cropped to 3588 pixels on the height, subject distance 2.7 metres

Even if our corporate depreciation schedule had room on it (which it doesn’t), we wouldn’t be investing in an OM-1 camera. Our existing E-M1X bodies meet our needs extremely well, and I absolutely love the handling, ergonomics and comfort that they provide. From my perspective there is no point buying a camera that isn’t comfortable to use for extended periods of time. I’m a very happy camper who doesn’t need an upgrade.

Technical Note:

Photographs were captured handheld using camera gear as noted in the EXIF data. Images were produced from RAW files using my standard process.  Crops are noted. Photographs were resized for web use. This is the 1,144 article published on this website since its original inception in 2015.

OM-D E-M1X + M.Zuiko 100-400 mm f/5-6.3 IS with M.Zuiko MC-14 teleconverter @ 210 mm, efov 420 mm, f/8.1, 1/2000, ISO-1000, Bird Detection AI Subject Tracking, Pro Capture L, cropped to 4389 pixels on the width, subject distance 35.9 metres

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16 thoughts on “OM-1 Upgrade Decision”

  1. Hi,

    I was wondering if you tested OM-1 with dragonfly and animal recognition.
    I would like to know its this camera can help at caching them in flight.

    Thanks

    1. Hi Al,

      I used Pro Capture H at 60 fps which does not offer continuous auto-focus. The first frame locks in focus and exposure for the rest of the image run. This approach meets my needs very well and I use it for all of my insects in flight photographs as well as for small birds taking flight. From time to time I use Pro Capture H for medium to larger sized birds in free flight.

      This is not a gear review website so I have not tested the OM-1 and have no plans to do so.

      Tom

  2. Hi Thomas,
    I bought my EM1X last summer and added the 100-400 prior to a trip to the Big Island on a bird tour. A very good decision (PS. We were with a wonderful guide and prolific photographer Jack Jeffrey). It seemed to me that the OM-1 was only a tiny bit better on capabilities than the EM1X but my skill was a much bigger limitation anyway. Interesting that the 100-400 won’t even benefit from the technology in the OM1 anyway. My gear is plenty for me now. My Dad gave me an OM-1 back in the 70’s that went to Africa with me and a Tamron 70-200. For a rooky, I brought back a couple nice shots.
    Keep up the good work.

    1. Hi David,

      The M.Zuiko 100-400 is not compatible with Pro Capture at 50 fps with C-AF. You would need to check the specs on the OM-1 but I think you would still benefit from many of the upgraded features of the OM-1 with that zoom lens. Since I’m not buying the OM-1 I haven’t gone over the specs in great detail.

      Tom

  3. Thomas, another excellent post on consumer behavior. I am what some call an early adopter or a FOMO buyer so I ordered the OM-1 on day one. I got a notice yesterday that it WILL be delivered tomorrow. I’m excited but not salivating because I already own a M1x, a M1.3 and a Panasonic G9.

    I don’t anticipate making better photos because of the camera. Maybe yes, maybe no, all depends on practice. I practice everyday with my M1x and in fact have gotten better. Not quite to your level but I’m working on it and some days get a few keepers that I think you would say, well done! Most of those are because I used your tips and practiced.

    Question for you. How do you get the focus distance from your exif data? I have Googled the neck out of that topic and remain clueless.

    1. Hi David,

      I use Windows Explorer to store all of my photography files. After I process an image I right click on the finished jpeg which opens up a detail box. I then click on properties… then details… then the distance to subject is visible. I think there are some software programs that can be used to reveal more EXIF details, but I just use Windows Explorer as it is quick and easy.

      Practicing is important. I was out today and challenged myself to only capture images using Pro Capture H. It made for an interesting morning.

      tom

  4. Hi Tom,

    Thanks for another insightful article. I agree with all you wrote. However I am one who has jumped ship and got the OM-1. If I could constantly get the results you get with the M1X I would be over the moon. But I struggle even though it is a fine camera.

    I have only had a one day shoot so far and am still tweaking the settings as it is a bit different to the M1X. Tomorrow will be another shoot with the new settings and focusing on birds in flight.

    And my thoughts of the OM-1 after limited use? I love it. I still have much to test. But the EVF is a huge improvement and more like viewing through an DSLR. And the autofocus and tracking and vastly improved.

    I actually plan on keeping my Mark 3 as my backup and selling the M1X. I don’t have a problem with the smaller body on the huge 150-400 and actually like the slightly reduced weight.

    Thanks again for another great article.

    Cheers
    Carol

    1. Hi Carol,

      I don’t think that you “jumped ship” but rather made a sound decision based on your field experience. Cameras are simply image making tools and not every camera will be the right fit for every photographer. It sounds like the OM-1 is a better fit for your needs and will provide you with many years of enjoyable and productive use.

      Tom

  5. Like the others I too was tempted with the OM-1 camera but my EM1 Markiii is not a year old yet. The tracking options would be nice but I am fairly new to bird photography so perhaps it’s not my camera that needs upgrading but rather my skills. I will go another season with no tracking on my camera and see what I can learn.
    Thanks for another great article.

    1. Hi Karen,

      Many photographers find that the regular C-AF works better than C-AF +TR on cameras like the E-M1 Mark III as long as they use a large enough AF pattern. You may also find it interesting to try using Cluster Area AF.

      Tom

  6. Great discussion with excellent points. Recently, I came to the same conclusion as you. When I upgraded to an E-M1 mk III, I kept my old mk II as a backup. However, the mkIII is so good and so reliable I haven’t used the older camera for a long time. With release of this new camera, I’m thinking I may wait and pick up a 1X on sale or used and sell the MkII. I don’t think I need the latest and greatest.

    1. Hi Robert,

      As you know, it all comes down to our individual needs and what gear is best suited to the work we do. Not sure where you are located. The E-M1X currently has a very attractive OMDS discount offered on it… if my memory serves it is $1,300 off in both the USA and Canada.

      Tom

      1. I am in the U. S. SF Bay Area. I shoot mostly landscapes including astrophotography and wildlife. I also have a Canon 5D IV. Since getting the Oly M1 mkIII and the Oly 40-150 f2.8 and the 100-400, I shoot much more wildlife. Your examples of BIF have helped me a lot. Your articles also helped me decide to jump to the Oly system for a trip to multiple safari camps in Botswana. I just couldn’t have done it with the heavy Canon gear. Will look at the X1. Thanks. Keep up the great articles.

  7. Thomas, I wrote a long comment on this article, and not being able to paste it in is very annoying.

    Howdy Thomas,

    First off let me say your photography of them thar birds is amazing. After reading this post I have some comments.

    I run two EM1Xs due to being in dusty environments in the desert and I mount two lenses and not have to switch. Also I am completely used to the X, and do not have to think when shooting, just do! I also run two X’s because the muscle memory is the same for each camera. Maybe a different C1 Thru C4 setup for each camera

    Dynamic range is more than I need as I am mostly a daytime shooter. The autofocus is a learning thing and I think that the new OM-1 would present me with the same issues I have with birds in flight, or critters in the wild. It all comes down to technique. I also shoot at about 10fps, so that is just fine for me. I am going to try your technique with ProCap on low and see how things look with that.

    The things I can’t live without on the X:

    – GPS GPS GPS, no need to connect to my phone. And in an extreme emergency, I can communicate lat/long to my rescuers!
    – Temperature readout
    – Altitude (most important of all)
    – Built in grip, as I have always gripped my cameras, and having the grip as an integral part of the camera is very important.
    – Heat pipes – I am usually in 100 degree F a lot the time.

    I use Topaz Sharpen AI, and Noise AI, and those work just fine on the Olympus RAW files.

    So it all comes down to this, I love the X, it does what I want, they are paid for! At first I was drooling over the new OM-1, but then the common sense side of me kicked in and I gave it a good long thought. The X does everything I want it to do, and more. Heck, I only use about 40% of the camera 🙂 Then it also came down to cost, I would need two OM-1s, two grips, battery chargers, etc, etc, etc. And not considering the time to read the manual and learn how to use the new cam.

    Just some thoughts.
    V/r
    Randy

    P.S. I LOVE MY X!

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